By Lyle Moran

MediaNews

SHIRLEY -- On Nov. 22, 1963, Bonnie Lind was home alone from high school because she was sick.

The Shirley resident, who was 16, turned on the radio and 50 years later still remembers how she felt when she heard President John F. Kennedy had been shot and learned later that he had died.

"I fell back on my bed stunned," said Lind, 66. "It was a real shocker. Everybody loved JFK."

Lind's father returned home after hearing about the tragic events while on his mail route. Lind's mother and older brother also returned home later in the day.

Kennedy was killed on a Friday, and the Lind family spent the next several days glued to their television.

"We were all devastated," said Lind, who worked many different office jobs before retiring. "We spent the whole weekend in front of the TV.

"I knew there was no more Camelot," Lind continued. "It showed a president could be killed because somebody does not like him. That is ridiculous."

Lind said her family admired Kennedy for his handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis, as well as his support of civil rights.

"I always have believed in everyone being equal," Lind said. "I never considered anyone different than anyone else."

The family also grieved when U.S. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy in 1968 was killed and John F. Kennedy Jr. died in a plane crash in 1999. Lind said she still wonders what could have been if not for JFK's presidency and life being cut short.

"I wish JFK had a chance for a second term," Lind said. "Who knows where would be right now?"

Follow Lyle Moran on Twitter @lylemoran.